How often should my stove be swept?
How much will it cost?
How long will it take?
Why can’t you give me an exact time for my appointment?
Will I need to cover the furniture?
What if my cowl comes off?
What if the inside of my chimney is in an old and fragile state?
I’ve just lit my fire and it is smoking – do I need to sweep the chimney?
What causes a chimney fire?
What is Carbon Monoxide?
What are the Symptoms of Carbon Monoxide poisoning?

Carbon Monoxide danger signs
Correct Installation
Adequate Maintenance
Chimneys
Defective Chimneys
Downdraught and Ventilation

How often should my stove be swept?
Wood – every 3 months if it’s your only heating in constant us
Smokeless Coal – Once a year
Coal – Twice a year
Oil Fired – Once a year
Gas – Once a Year
Artificial logs – every 3 months in use
Demolition timber – every 3 months in use. (Never burn proofed / painted timber

Multi fuel stoves and wood burners with stainless steel Flexible liners installed normally  have a 5 inch or 6 inch diameter , so the same info above applys  when sweeping ,ask your professional chimney sweep for advice  as he will inform you if you will need it doing more than once per year which is the Minimum.

How much will it cost?
Standard Power Sweep with NACS certificate £60

Birds  Nest removal standard £80. If more than 1h 30 min there will be additional cost

Pots supplied and fitted, working at heights law (might need scaffolding/Cherry picker)

Cowls venting caps – Supply and fit (Cottages and Bungalows only)

How long will it take?
The average chimney sweeping takes about 30 minutes to 45 minutes
The clearing of a birds nest can take longer depending, if clearing takes over 1h 30min there will be a charge ,

Why can’t you give me an exact time for my appointment?
You will be given an approximate time of visit i.e. 8am-10am, 9am-12pm, 2pm-5pm etc. Please be patient with time keeping, previous jobs and traffic can easily delay the estimated time of arrival but I try my best to be on time.

Will I need to cover the furniture?
Please move items from the mantel piece and hearth, remove any un-burnt fuel on the fire.
I would recommend that any light furnishings or anything of particular value in the room is removed or covered.
Particularly on wet days or where there are light carpets It would be advisable to lay a trail of old sheets or newspaper from the door to the fireplace for the sweeps to walk on. I will always respect your home and take great care to minimise any soiling.
I will lay a protective sheet in front of the fireplace and use specially manufactured sweeps sponges to shield the fireplace and retain the soot behind. I use a commercial, specially designed vacuum which enters the system and controls the soot and dust from entering your home.
I will be using state of the art chimney sweeping equipment. Please feel free to ask any questions relating to your fire or chimney, stack and pot/terminal.

What if the sweep cannot be carried out when you get here Due to a dangerous install or the fire is still on or to hot to sweep, When you have booked a chimney sweep, the time has been allocated to you and the visit to your property has taken place. If no work can be undertaken there will be a fee of half the full amount charged for the call to cover time and fuel £30.

What if my cowl comes off?
A chimney stack, pot and any cowls should be able to withstand a chimney sweep
If for any reason, a pot or cowl breaks or becomes dislodged during this process All cowls should be fixed when fitted, if a cowl pops off i the chimney sweep cannot take any responsibility.
If you have a wire mesh ball ,these are the most common and will come of as they are not normally Fixed but instead just spring loaded and pushed into the pot, in the likely event I will endeavour to replace your old cowl or wire mesh by fitting a proper stainless steel Fixed cowl at a charge to the home owner if requested (Cottages and Bungalows only)

What if the inside of my chimney is in an old and fragile state?
If you suspect this is the case, please advise me of this prior to the sweep. If you have had problems with smoke after the chimney was swept, this could be due to the chimney being partially blocked by mortar/ mid-feather brick collapse.

I’ve just lit my fire and it is smoking – do I need to sweep the chimney?
Yes.

What causes a chimney fire?
When fires smoulder, unburned gases condense and deposit on the stove pipes and the flue as runny acids and liquid tars that harden into creosote. Both a cool flue and steam from green or wet wood encourage this condensation.
When creosote deposits on the smoke chamber and flue walls are set alight by high heat or by flames licking up the chimney. It has a roar like a freight train, it can crack open a flueliner and chimney and spread to the structure of the house.

What is Carbon Monoxide?
Carbon monoxide is Deadly! a highly poisonous gas. It is colourless, odourless and tasteless and can be produced by appliances that use gas, wood, oil, coal or smokeless fuel. Carbon Monoxide is potentially fatal, and even low-levels of the poison can cause lasting damage to your health.
Any fuel burning appliance, has the potential to produce dangerous levels of carbon monoxide gas.

What are the Symptoms of Carbon Monoxide poisoning?
The symptoms of Carbon Monoxide poisoning are similar to the ‘flu’; feeling sick and dizzy, tiredness, headache, stomach and chest pains

Carbon Monoxide danger signs
Carbon Monoxide danger signs such as sooting or staining around the appliance and excessive condensation in the room.
Carbon Monoxide can also be present in smoke from solid fuel, wood or oil appliances.
Blocking ventilation or misusing your appliance can lead to Carbon Monoxide poisoning.
EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT BLOOD CARBOXHAEMOGLOBIN LEVELS
Blood % saturation
with
carboxyhaemoglobin Symptoms
0-10 None
10-20 Tightness across forehead
20-30 Headaches
30-40 Severe headaches, weakness, dizziness, nausea vomiting
40-50 Collapse, increased pulse rate and respiratory rate
50-60 Coma, intermittent convulsions
60-70 Depressed heart action, death possible
70-80 Weak pulse, slowed respiration, death likely
80-90 Death in minutes
“Extracted from Canada Safety Council Data Sheet on carbon monoxide
Precautions for the Prevention of CO Poisoning

Correct Installation
All combustion appliances for heating have to be installed in accordance with
Building Regulations Part J and the manufacturer’s instructions. These
Regulations govern, for instance, the amount of ventilation required for your
appliance, the distance of the installation from combustible material, the size of
hearth, the size of the flue and height of the chimney.

Adequate Maintenance
Solid Fuel and Wood Burning Appliances are generally very easy to maintain. The Solid Fuel Association recommends you have your appliance checked on an annual basis. This will not only assure you of the safety of the appliance, but also ensure it is working as efficiently as possible.
It is important that you should clean the throat plate of a stove or room heater on a monthly basis because a build-up of soot can cause a blockage and the carbon monoxide (and the smoke) may not be drawn safely up the chimney. This is generally very simple, although many people leave this job for their chimney sweep, but if you only have the chimney sweep once or twice a year and you use the fire on a regular basis, this is not enough. The flueways at the back of boilers need to be cleaned once a week.
Regularly check the door seal on your stove for a tight fit.
Your ash pan should be emptied daily or more regularly as the ash builds up. The ash pit door if you have one, should also fit snugly.
If you have cracked or missing glass in the stove door, this should be replaced immediately.
Also, do not leave the doors of a closed appliance open, unless approved by the appliance manufacturer.

Chimneys
The chimney must be kept clean and be free of any major defect and be the only route for the smoke and gases, including carbon monoxide, to exit the house The recommended time to sweep a chimney is just prior to the main burning season in the autumn. If you are burning housecoal or wood, the chimney should be swept again during the burning season. Use a sweep who is a member of a bona fide organisation which provides training such as N.A.C.S,
Blockages and restrictions to the chimney can be caused by:
A build-up of soot,
Resinous tars (particularly if you burn damp wood or pine),
Bird nests, dead birds, cobwebs
Chimney deposits (caused by heavy rain) being washed down the flue

Defective Chimneys
Harmful gases can escape into your house or if on a party wall, into your neighbors’ house, if the chimney is defective. If you are opening up your fireplace to install or reinstall a solid fuel appliance, always get the chimney smoke tested first. When the chimney is very old or of unusual construction a full investigation using a video camera is advisable. If the lining or mortar in the chimney is cracked, gases may escape in the house – this may cause staining on walls or a smell of smoke in upstairs rooms or in loft spaces. If you smell smoke in these circumstances, do not use the appliance until the chimney has been checked and relined if necessary.

Downdraught and Ventilation
Sometimes smoke is not pulled up the flue and comes back down the chimney. This is often a problem with large fireplaces. Insufficient draw in the chimney may be caused by a variety of reasons. Some of these are: an incorrect ratio between the flue size and the fireplace opening; insufficient ventilation getting into the room with the appliance in; (Building Regulations stipulate the size of airbrick required for appliances of different outputs); the situation of the dwelling may create high pressure zones on the roof which prevents the smoke escaping. Often homeowners fit the wrong kind of cowl to try to cure this problem. Some designs of cowl are suitable for solid fuel but the wrong kind can prevent smoke escaping.